My first Year Of keeping Chickens – by Emma Brown

I grew up on a small farm in Wales and used to tell my parents that all I wanted to do was live in the Big Smoke and far away from the boring fields, hills & animals of the countryside – how wrong I was! It turned out that I lasted 6 months in London, before retreating to the relative peace of Wiltshire where I found work, met my husband, got married and had two daughters.

I grew up on a small farm in Wales and used to tell my parents that all I wanted to do was live in the Big Smoke and far away from the boring fields, hills & animals of the countryside - how wrong I was! It turned out that I lasted 6 months in London, before retreating to the relative peace of Wiltshire where I found work, met my husband, got married and had two daughters. My yearning for chickens began a few years ago and has grown gradually stronger, until last year I could resist no more. I got 2 hybrid chickens, one Columbian Black-tail and one Crested Legbar, from another chicken-loving friend in my village and have since added another 3 ex-battery chickens who were awaiting slaughter. There was a fourth, Anna, but unfortunately, after 3 months in the sunshine, she succumbed to illness and was buried under an apple tree in our field. My daughters have given them their names - Edith, Margo, Elsa, Noria & Divia - and they are still as excited about checking for eggs as they were when we first got them. They help me clean them out, give them snacks and sometimes sing and dance in the field to entertain them! It has been amazing watching the ex-bats grow their feathers back, enjoy their first dust baths, sunbathe and relax into life outside of the factory. They are extremely affectionate and love a cuddle. Every day, when they hear my car pull up, they come running to say hello and I am torn between staying with them for hugs and rushing in to see my children! They have added such richness and happiness to our lives (although my husband isn't very pleased with the state of the garden but that is largely thanks to the rescue ducks that have recently joined the family!). I have always loved animals and have two 9 year old cats that have moved with us through the years, so I knew I would love my chickens. What I didn't expect was HOW much they would come to mean to me - I held Anna in my arms when she was dying and literally cried for a whole day after she died - and she had only been with us for 3 months. Each chicken has their own individual personality and they vary so much - one is shy, one is flighty, one is so tame that she sits in my arms and goes to sleep, one loves dust baths so much that you have to physically remove her from the flower bed when you want to put her to bed and one still can't work out the steps up into the run, after many weeks of showing her and makes me laugh with her attempts every night. They lay wonderful eggs with bright orange yolks and have made me realise that so called 'free range' eggs in supermarkets are actually not as they seem. I used to turn up to the houses of friends with wine and flowers - now I inevitably turn up with wine and eggs instead - people seem to love receiving fresh eggs from the hens they see pop up in their Facebook feeds so often! In fact my husband did suggest that I might like to take a few more photos of the children rather than using my whole memory card on the chickens! For anyone considering getting chickens, don’t hesitate, they are a wonderful addition to any family! I now know that I will be keeping chickens for many years to come - there is no end in sight - I am have officially got a chicken addiction and am without a doubt a crazy chicken lady!
Emma with a chicken

My yearning for chickens began a few years ago and has grown gradually stronger, until last year I could resist no more. I got 2 hybrid chickens, one Columbian Black-tail and one Crested Legbar, from another chicken-loving friend in my village and have since added another 3 ex-battery chickens who were awaiting slaughter. There was a fourth, Anna, but unfortunately, after 3 months in the sunshine, she succumbed to illness and was buried under an apple tree in our field. My daughters have given them their names – Edith, Margo, Elsa, Noria & Divia – and they are still as excited about checking for eggs as they were when we first got them. They help me clean them out, give them snacks and sometimes sing and dance in the field to entertain them! It has been amazing watching the ex-bats grow their feathers back, enjoy their first dust baths, sunbathe and relax into life outside of the factory. They are extremely affectionate and love a cuddle. Every day, when they hear my car pull up, they come running to say hello and I am torn between staying with them for hugs and rushing in to see my children! They have added such richness and happiness to our lives (although my husband isn’t very pleased with the state of the garden but that is largely thanks to the rescue ducks that have recently joined the family!). I have always loved animals and have two 9 year old cats that have moved with us through the years, so I knew I would love my chickens. What I didn’t expect was HOW much they would come to mean to me – I held Anna in my arms when she was dying and literally cried for a whole day after she died – and she had only been with us for 3 months. Each chicken has their own individual personality and they vary so much – one is shy, one is flighty, one is so tame that she sits in my arms and goes to sleep, one loves dust baths so much that you have to physically remove her from the flower bed when you want to put her to bed and one still can’t work out the steps up into the run, after many weeks of showing her and makes me laugh with her attempts every night.

 

emmalalebrown@yahoo.co.uk

They lay wonderful eggs with bright orange yolks and have made me realise that so called ‘free range’ eggs in supermarkets are actually not as they seem. I used to turn up to the houses of friends with wine and flowers – now I inevitably turn up with wine and eggs instead – people seem to love receiving fresh eggs from the hens they see pop up in their Facebook feeds so often! In fact my husband did suggest that I might like to take a few more photos of the children rather than using my whole memory card on the chickens! For anyone considering getting chickens, don’t hesitate, they are a wonderful addition to any family! I now know that I will be keeping chickens for many years to come – there is no end in sight – I am have officially got a chicken addiction and am without a doubt a crazy chicken lady!

Fresh Start for Hens and Green Valley Poultry Supplies

Money off for Fresh Start For Hens Re-homers

We’ve joined up with Fresh Start for Hens to offer £6000 of  discounts voucher to people re-homing their first hens through their up coming re-homings.  Each of these 1000 £6 vouchers will be distributed by FSFH and primarily aimed at people taking on their first ex-commercial hens.  The vouchers will help towards your first few purchases for chicken equipment.

Who are Fresh Start for Hens?

Fresh start For Hens
Fresh Start For hens

They are a non profit group who liaise with farmers to collect their hens at the end of their commercial life – normally around 18 months old when they have their first moult and egg production pauses for a few months. The hens are then distributed through regional centers where they are assessed and then passed on to their new owners.

These hens can be from any of the 3 types of farming methods, caged (battery hens), barn (hens that are free to move within a barn but not outside) or Free Range.  All commercial hens normally become pet food at the end of their working life.

They also work work to enlighten people as to the plight of the commercial hen, and demonstrate that there are alternatives to early slaughter.

How do I re-home ex-commercial hens?

There are several groups that work with farmer and organise the distribution of ex commercial hens to new home. Fresh Start for Hens is one of them and they are are approaching  50000 re homed hens to date.

To find out when the next rehoming is there is a page on their website to reserve hens from FSFH .  All new keepers are vetted so prevent hens being sold on for profit and to ensure they have suitable accommodation.

 

Paying by bank transfer from outside the UK

We can accept payments from almost anywhere in the world.

Sometimes card payments don’t work for international payments especially if you rarely make oversea purchases.

For these we find Transferwise to be quick and easy.  We use them to make our international payments to our suppliers. They allow you to send money either from your bank account or debit/credit card and normally at a much better rate than you’d get paying through your own bank.  For new customers to Transferwise introduced through one of our links they will even waive the usual transfer fees (correct at the time of writing).

They will also deal with letting us know when the transfer has been completed so one less thing for you to do.

transferwise international money transfers

To pay via international bank transfer place your order on our website in the usual way and choose “pay by bank transfer” in the checkout.  Once you have the total and the order number visit Transferwise and arrange the transfer.

Once your account is set up it’s easy to then send money worldwide at low transfer rates.

 

How to Pay

How to pay for your order from Green Valley Poultry Supplies

We use Paypal to process our online transactions but this doesn’t mean you need to open a paypal account if you don’t want to.

If you’ve purchased a house or run from us over the phone we will email you a payment request.  If you are paying online go straight to step 3.

Step 1 – You’ll receive an email from Paypal requesting payment.  Click on the “Pay Now” button near the bottom of the email.

Green-Valley-Poultry-Supplies-would-like-to-be-paid-through-PayPal

Step 2. Review the invoice and then click on “Continue”

Here-s-your-invoice

Step 3.  Choose your payment method.

If you already have a Paypal account you can proceed as normal but if you don’t then the lower option “Pay with a debit or credit card” is the option you require.

Pay-with-a-PayPal-accountl